EU hails signing of Interim Joint Ceasefire Agreement

By on April 7, 2017


The European Union (EU) on Friday hailed the Interim Joint Ceasefire Agreement signed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines (NDGP) during the 4th round of peace talks in The Netherlands.  (File:Malacañang Palace.jpg) [Public domain])
The European Union (EU) on Friday hailed the Interim Joint Ceasefire Agreement signed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines (NDGP) during the 4th round of peace talks in The Netherlands.
(File:Malacañang Palace.jpg) [Public domain])
MANILA—The European Union (EU) on Friday hailed the Interim Joint Ceasefire Agreement signed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines (NDGP) during the 4th round of peace talks in The Netherlands.

In a press statement, EU, that has 28-member states, said it “stands ready to support the implementation of the agreement.”

“This Interim Agreement demonstrates the power of political processes to resolve conflict. It is an encouraging step towards generating goodwill and trust in the peace negotiations, to encourage the forging of a more stable and comprehensive Joint Ceasefire Agreement and to provide an enabling environment for an early signing of a comprehensive Agreement on Social and Economic Reforms,” the statement said.

On April 5, 2017, the GRP and the NDFP reached an Agreement on an Interim Joint Ceasefire which is to be effective until a permanent ceasefire agreement is forged as part of a Comprehensive Agreement on End of Hostilities and Disposition of Forces.

Both panels tried to break the impasse to move forward hoping to attain long lasting peace and put an end to the almost five-decade insurgency.

This after President Rodrigo Duterte alerted the GRP panel not to push through with the 4th round of talks until after his four conditions were met.

The four conditions were the immediate release of captured police and military personnel, the signing of a bilateral ceasefire agreement; a stop to the alleged extortion activities of rebels; and the non-recognition of any territorial claim made by the communists.