Spirit of EDSA still alive, but reforms needed—Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano

By , on February 24, 2014


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Photo: Facebook Page of Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano

DAGUPAN CITY, Philippines— The spirit of the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution is still alive, Sen. Alan Peter Cayetano said in an interview with the press on Feb. 24, Monday.

“People power is also very much alive. In fact, the abolition of pork (Priority Development Assistance Fund) is testament to people power. Through the proactiveness of the media and through the organizers on social media, what they thought would never be accomplished was accomplished,” he added.

For the lawmaker, the 28th anniversary of the bloodless civilian-backed revolution that ousted dictator Ferdinand Marcos should not pass without realizing its true significance, “We are still facing big problems and they won’t go away if nobody will fight. It will just be coming back, like corruption. And second, when people act in faith and act together, it can be done,” Cayetano said.

“Corruption is everywhere. It’s in every country. The difference is that in other countries, there is a resolution—those found guilty are jailed. In our country, people do not see the wheels of justice moving. An example, there is the Ampatuan massacre. After four years, it’s still there,” he added.

 

People Power

Cayetano believes that People Power is indeed needed so that cases would be filed to those who should be charged.

He said that the abolition of the pork barrel scam was just the start of the country’s long battle to ensure that those who are truly responsible for the plunder of the people’s money should be prosecuted and jailed.

“When people act in faith and act together, it can be done. Kung kailangan ng People Power para makasuhan na ang mga dapat kasuhan, [then we should do it],” he stressed. ( If People Power is needed to file cases against the accused, then we should do it).

It should also push the government to institute reforms and eradicate corruption, he added.

“I think this 28th year anniversary of EDSA is a reminder to all branches of government, like Judiciary, legislature and executive. We just have to keep renewing the sense of hope but we have to show to people that something can happen afterwards,” he said.