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A better mammogram? Huge study putting 3 D scans to the test

WASHINGTON — A better mammogram? Increasingly women are asked if they want a 3-D mammogram instead of the regular X-ray — and now U.S. health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier choice really improves screening for breast cancer. It’s the latest dilemma in a field that already vexes …

Replacing lymph nodes to ease painful legacy of cancer care

WASHINGTON — Breast cancer treatment left Susan Wolfe-Tank with an arm too painfully swollen to lift anything heavy or even fit into her usual clothing — a debilitating condition that gets little attention and has no cure. Desperate, the Wisconsin woman travelled hundreds of miles to seek a delicate operation — replacing under-arm lymph nodes …

Millions die suffering amid global opioid gap, report says

WASHINGTON – Nearly 26 million people around the world die each year with serious suffering in part because of a huge gap in pain relief: The U.S. may be awash in opioid painkillers, but they’re rare or unavailable in dozens of poor countries, says a new report. The challenge is to improve palliative care in …

Studying 1 million people to end cookie cutter health care

WASHINGTON— U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments, and lifestyles interact. Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The massive “All of Us” project instead will push …

Age matters when it comes to screening for cervical cancer

WASHINGTON — Getting checked for cervical cancer isn’t one-size-fits-all: Millions of women may soon have to decide between a routine Pap or a newer test that detects if they have a cancer-causing virus. Draft national guidelines released Tuesday for the first time say either option is reasonable for certain women — those ages 30 to …

First embryo gene repair holds promise for inherited disease

WASHINGTON—Altering human heredity? In a first, researchers safely repaired a disease-causing gene in human embryos, targeting a heart defect best known for killing young athletes — a big step toward one day preventing a list of inherited diseases. In a surprising discovery, a research team led by Oregon Health and & Science University reported Wednesday …

Colorectal cancer rare but rising among millennials, Gen X

WASHINGTON –Colorectal cancer mostly strikes middle-aged and older people, but new research shows a disturbing rise in cases among young adults. Tuesday’s study by the American Cancer Society is a reminder that while this type of cancer is rare in the young, no one should ignore symptoms just because the person is a 20- or …

Talk to babies and let them babble back to bridge word gap

WASHINGTON –Even infants can have conversations with mom or dad. Their turn just tends to involve a smile or some gibberish instead of words. That’s a key lesson from programs that are coaching parents to talk more with their babies – and recording their attempts. At issue is how to bridge the infamous “word gap,” …

Talk to babies and let them babble back to bridge word gap

WASHINGTON—Even infants can have conversations with mom or dad. Their turn just tends to involve a smile or some gibberish instead of words. That’s a key lesson from programs that are coaching parents to talk more with their babies — and recording their attempts. At issue is how to bridge the infamous “word gap,” the …

Flabby heart keeps pumping with squeeze from robotic sleeve

WASHINGTON—Scientists are developing a robotic sleeve that can encase a flabby diseased heart and gently squeeze to keep it pumping. So far it’s been tested only in animals, improving blood flow in pigs. But this “soft robotic” device mimics the natural movements of a beating heart, a strategy for next-generation treatments of deadly heart failure. …

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