About 150,000 Hydro Quebec clients without power as of Monday afternoon

By on October 31, 2017


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also had to deal with the bad weather in Quebec on his way to work Monday. (Photo by John McCallum/Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also had to deal with the bad weather in Quebec on his way to work Monday. (Photo by John McCallum/Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0)

MONTREAL — About 150,000 Hydro-Quebec customers remained without electricity as of late Monday afternoon after strong winds and heavy rain caused havoc with the province’s power grid.

The utility said the intense depression coming from New England hit several areas of the province, as winds of 90 km/h caused branches and trees to knock down power lines.

Some 300 linemen were working to fix problems in every part of the province — the hardest hit as of 4 p.m. ET being Monteregie south of Montreal, where more than 29,000 were without electricity.

Other areas badly affected were the Laurentians north of Montreal and the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean a few hundred kilometres north of Quebec City.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also had to deal with the bad weather in Quebec on his way to work Monday.

His office said there was some flooding on the street outside Trudeau’s residence in the Gatineau Hills near Meech Lake.

A spokesman said that, in order to reach a street that wasn’t flooded, Trudeau had to use an all-terrain vehicle and travel through some back roads.

Trudeau couldn’t get to the motorcade that usallly brings him into Ottawa, which is normally about an hour’s drive away, the spokesman said.

Meanwhile, Environment Canada meteorologist Ian Hubbard said there were wind warnings across Nova Scotia, P.E.I., and for parts of New Brunswick and western Newfoundland by Monday afternoon.

Halifax International Airport reported wind gusts up to 76 km/h as the system headed east across Atlantic Canada.

Gusts of 110 km/h were forecast for parts of Newfoundland’s west coast by Monday evening into Tuesday morning. Top speeds of 150 km/h were anticipated for Wreckhouse, N.L., a flat expanse near Port aux Basques between the Long Range Mountains and the ocean. The area is notorious for hurricane-force winds that can blow over tractor trailers.

The system was expected to produce comparatively little rain in Atlantic Canada, with no warnings issued by mid-afternoon.