Majority of Filipinos rejects PNP’s ‘nanlaban’ narrative—SWS survey

By , on September 29, 2017


FILE: Philippine National Police personnel on December 31 at the National Headquarters (Photo: Philippine National Police/Facebook)
FILE: Philippine National Police personnel on December 31 at the National Headquarters (Photo: Philippine National Police/Facebook)

MANILA, Philippines—Majority of Filipinos thinks that persons killed by the police in its campaign against illegal drugs did not resist arrests, a recent Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed.

In the survey conducted by the social research institution SWS from June 23 to 26, respondents were asked whether they agree or not with this statement: “Marami sa mga pinatay ng mga pulis sa kampanya laban sa ilegal na droga ay hindi totoong nanlaban sa pulis [Many of those killed by the police in its campaign against illegal drugs did not really resist arrests].”

Twenty percent of the respondents strongly agreed with the statement while 34% somewhat agreed. Only 8% strongly disagreed while 12% said they somewhat disagree. The rest of the respondents were undecided.

The respondents are composed of 300 persons each from Metro Manila, Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, totaling to 1200.

Metro Manila, with 63%, has the highest number of respondents who said that they don’t believe in the police’s ‘nanlaban’ narrative. Second is Luzon with 56%. Forty-nine percent of respondents from both Visayas and Mindanao believe the same.

Finger-pointing

Meanwhile, a large number of the respondents believe that many are simply telling on their enemies so they could be killed by the police or vigilantes.

Respondents were asked whether they agree or not with this statetement: “Marami ang nagsisinungaling at itinuturo ang kanilang mga personal na kaaway bilang drug user/pusher para mabigyang dahilan na patayin ang mga taong ito ng mga pulis o vigilante [Many are lying and pointing at their personal enemies as drug user/pusher so an excuse could be given for these people to be killed by the police or vigilante].”

Forty-nine percent of the respondents agreed with the statement while 24% disagreed. The rest were undecided.

Out of the 49% who agreed, 17% strongly agreed while 32% somewhat agreed. Eleven percent of those who don’t believe the statement disagreed to it strongly while 13% somewhat disagreed.

Furthermore, the respondents were divided when asked if most of those killed in the anti-illegal drugs operations weren’t really drug pushers.

They were asked whether they agree or not with this statement: “Marami sa mga pinatay ng mga pulis sa kampanya laban sa ilegal na droga ay hindi naman talaga mga nagtutulak ng droga o drug pusher [Many of those killed by the police in the campaign against illegal drugs weren’t really pushing drugs or drug pushers].”

Half of the respondents agreed with the statement while the other half disagreed.

The SWS survey didn’t sit well with Malacanang. Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella said that the answers may have been “influenced” because respondents were asked “leading” questions.

“It seems the 2nd Quarter Social Weather Stations (SWS) Survey contains leading and pointed questions that may have unduly influenced the answers of respondents,” he said.

“We expect pollsters to exercise prudence and objectivity to arrive at a closer approximation of public sentiment,” he added.