LTFRB mulls fixed hours for Uber and Grab drivers

By , on July 28, 2017


LTFRB board member and spokesperson Aileen Lizada explained that transport network vehicle services (TNVS) providers are considered as a form of public service that must have fixed hours on the road. (PNA Photo)
LTFRB board member and spokesperson Aileen Lizada explained that transport network vehicle services (TNVS) providers are considered as a form of public service that must have fixed hours on the road. (PNA Photo)

MANILA, July 28 — The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) is considering the imposition of minimum working hours for Uber and Grab drivers.

LTFRB board member and spokesperson Aileen Lizada explained that transport network vehicle services (TNVS) providers are considered as a form of public service that must have fixed hours on the road.

The measure will help regulate the drivers of TNVS operators along the roads.

The LTFRB official said that franchises that will be granted to the transport network companies (TNCs) and TNVS should be well utilized.

“If we will grant franchises, there should be a minimum number of hours that they need to be online. Because if we will give franchises, but they will only work for two hours a week, it would be a waste. It would be better to give the franchise to other operators,” according to Lizada.

Minimum working hours would also help address the current practice of Uber and Grab drivers who ply along the roads only when there is a surge in prices because of increased demand of passengers.

Currently, Grab classifies drivers as part-time if they stay on the roads below 40 hours a week, and full-time if they clock higher hours.

Uber, for its part, classifies drivers as “casual drivers” if they operate below 10 hours, part-time if below 40, and full-time if above 40.

Around 40,000 TNVS units are plying the streets without certificates of public convenience (CPC) or provisional authority (PA).

The LTFRB has issued a directive Wednesday that Uber and Grab must deactivate drivers who were registered after June 30, 2017.

The board reiterated that both TNCs should submit their master list of all their drivers as of June 30, 2017.

The LTFRB has been conducting meetings with TNCs to address various concerns such as accreditation and pending applications, accountability and dynamic pricing scheme. It also plans to consult with Congress to craft a comprehensive law regulating ride sharing services.

  • mama sapano

    Lizada and Tugade only want to convey a message: Money. This move is suspected to push driver operators to pay under the table to LTFRB Chiefs. Lizada has no difference from prostitute, whereas Tugade from “bugaw”.