Merkel’s party stays strong in poll

By on May 28, 2017


The Christian Democratic Union (CDU) of Germany, led by Merkel, got 38 percent of the voter support while the Social Democratic Party (SPD), headed by ex-President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz, fell to 25 percent, according to the opinion poll designed by research institute Emnid and local media Bild am Sonntag. (Photo: Angela Merkel/ Facebook)
The Christian Democratic Union (CDU) of Germany, led by Merkel, got 38 percent of the voter support while the Social Democratic Party (SPD), headed by ex-President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz, fell to 25 percent, according to the opinion poll designed by research institute Emnid and local media Bild am Sonntag. (Photo: Angela Merkel/ Facebook)

BERLIN— German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s political union stays strong against its major rivals months ahead of the federal election, according to a latest poll released on Sunday.

The Christian Democratic Union (CDU) of Germany, led by Merkel, got 38 percent of the voter support while the Social Democratic Party (SPD), headed by ex-President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz, fell to 25 percent, according to the opinion poll designed by research institute Emnid and local media Bild am Sonntag.

The supporting rate for the Free Democratic Party (FDP), the Green Party, the Left and right-wing Alternative for Germany (AFD) were equal at 8 percent.

The poll also showed that if German chancellor were directly elected, 52 percent would opt for Merkel and 29 percent would choose Schulz.

German Federal elections will be held in Germany on September 24. Many local media noted the focus would be on Merkel’s re-election bid facing Schulz’s powerful challenge.

Earlier in February, some opinion polls have constantly showed Schulz will have the edge over Merkel in the coming election. Some local media even dubbed it as “Schulz effect,” and speculated Schulz might substitute Merkel since she lost momentum due to the migrant crisis.

In a similar questionnaire in February, Schulz won 46 percent over Merkel’s 40 percent.

But the recent SPD setbacks in state elections, in Saarland, Schleswig-Holstein and North Rhine-Westphalia have dimmed the hope of Schulz since he failed to transform his popularity into votes.