Experts predict instability in the legislature after B.C. election

By on May 10, 2017


The final results of British Columbia's election are still not in, but already experts are predicting an unstable government that is unlikely to last a full four-year term. (Photo: TUBS/ Wikipedia)
The final results of British Columbia’s election are still not in, but already experts are predicting an unstable government that is unlikely to last a full four-year term. (Photo: TUBS/ Wikipedia)

VANCOUVER – The final results of British Columbia’s election are still not in, but already experts are predicting an unstable government that is unlikely to last a full four-year term.

Voters in B.C. elected their first minority government in 65 years on Tuesday, awarding the Liberals 43 seats, the NDP 41 and the Greens three.

Hamish Telford, a political scientist at the University of the Fraser Valley, says even if the Liberals take control of the legislature by picking up an extra seat once absentee ballots are tallied, that would still leave the party with a razor-thin majority at 44 seats in the 87-seat legislature.

Conversely, the NDP teaming up with the Greens would give them a fragile minority government.

Norman Ruff, a professor emeritus of political science at the University of Victoria, says it’s more likely the Liberals or the NDP would sign some kind of two-year accord with the Greens in exchange for their support in propping up the government.

It could take several weeks before the final seat count is confirmed, once absentee votes are counted and any judicial recounts are conducted.