Contaminated meat products recalled in several US states

By on May 6, 2017


About 5,620 pounds of boneless veal, ground veal, beef and pork products produced by a farm could have been contaminated with E. coli, and the Pennsylvania-based Souderton has distributed these products to retail stores in Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia, according to the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection service. (Photo: Christopher Bulle/ Flickr)
About 5,620 pounds of boneless veal, ground veal, beef and pork products produced by a farm could have been contaminated with E. coli, and the Pennsylvania-based Souderton has distributed these products to retail stores in Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia, according to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection service. (Photo: Christopher Bulle/ Flickr)

CHICAGO–The state of Illinois among several other US states are recalling meat products distributed by a Pennsylvania-based company for E. coli contamination.

About 5,620 pounds of boneless veal, ground veal, beef and pork products produced by a farm could have been contaminated with E. coli, and the Pennsylvania-based Souderton has distributed these products to retail stores in Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia, according to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection service.

There has been no adverse reaction so far as a result of the consumption reported.

The Illinois State Meat Inspection Service notified the Food Safety and Inspection Service on May 2 that samples of the products tested positive for the presence of non-0157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, the Chicago Sun-Times reported Thursday.

Non-0157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli outbreaks are rare. Most people recover within a week and experience dehydration, abdominal cramps and bloody diarrhea after exposure.

While anyone can suffer, those less than five years old and older adults are most susceptible, and their symptoms may potentially be deadly, experts say.