Christy Clark optimistic as B.C. election approaches halfway mark

By on April 23, 2017


Liberal Leader Christy Clark spoke to media at the starting line of the annual Sun Run in Vancouver on Sunday, saying her party is working hard to get its message out before voters head to the ballot box on May 9. (Photo: Christy Clark/ Facebook)
Liberal Leader Christy Clark spoke to media at the starting line of the annual Sun Run in Vancouver on Sunday, saying her party is working hard to get its message out before voters head to the ballot box on May 9. (Photo: Christy Clark/ Facebook)

VANCOUVER –British Columbia’s election campaign is nearing the halfway point and one party leader says she’s feeling optimistic, but acknowledges that the race is far from over.

Liberal Leader Christy Clark spoke to media at the starting line of the annual Sun Run in Vancouver on Sunday, saying her party is working hard to get its message out before voters head to the ballot box on May 9.

“There’s a reason there’s 28 days in a campaign, because we spend every day talking about the things that we stand for and the things that we believe in,” she said.

The Liberals are campaigning on a job creation and economic growth platform, and Clark said that will require standing up to the U.S. in order to secure a new softwood lumber deal amid U.S. President Donald Trump’s protectionist rhetoric.

“We’ve got to make sure we stand up for British Columbia and get this softwood deal done. We’ve got to make sure we keep taxes low because we’ve got to be competitive compared to the United States, absolutely with this Donald Trump government,” she said.

Meanwhile, the NDP is pledging to make life more affordable for British Columbians, with promises like $10-a-day daycare and scrapping tolls on two busy bridges in Metro Vancouver.

Clark criticized the NDP on Sunday, saying their plaform “appears to be changing ever day,” and gave the party’s stance on scrapping medical services premiums as an example.

The NDP have pledged to do away with the fees, but Clark says it’s unclear how they intend to make up the revenue.

“It’s kind of a moving target when they’re changing their policies every day,” she said.

One man standing at the race’s starting line heckled Clark as she readied to run, calling on her to go back to the corporate boardroom before Liberal staff stepped in and he stopped.