Lacson optimistic that Congress will act on nat’l ID system bill this time

By on April 17, 2017


Sen. Panfilo Lacson on Monday lamented how the past congresses failed to give attention to a measure he filed seeking to create a National ID (identification) Reference System. (Photo: Senator Ping Lacson/Facebook)
Sen. Panfilo Lacson on Monday lamented how the past congresses failed to give attention to a measure he filed seeking to create a National ID (identification) Reference System. (Photo: Senator Ping Lacson/Facebook)

MANILA—Sen. Panfilo Lacson on Monday lamented how the past congresses failed to give attention to a measure he filed seeking to create a National ID (identification) Reference System.

He said that he could no longer remember how many times he has filed his measure.

“I can’t remember how many times I’ve filed the bill. I hope that 17th Congress will mind it this time,” Lacson said via Twitter.

He said that his proposed measure seeks to make it easier to identify the real poor and give them free hospitalization and other forms of assistance.

The senator also assumed that the measure is taking some time to be given attention because it prohibits ID holders from using aliases, evading tax and hiding their wealth.

Last year, Lacson filed Senate Bill 41 seeking the creation of a National Reference System to record and provide a single official identification for all citizens and foreign residents of the Philippines.

The system shall assign a national reference number to each citizen and foreign resident, together with a national reference card.

Lacson’s measure allows the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) to provide a unique national reference number to each individual, and the reference card shall be tamper-proof. The system will set up a registry where records and information about individuals are collected and stored.

Information in the National Reference Card will include the Reference Number, full name, permanent address, date and place of birth, signature, the photograph of the individual, blood type, and next of kin of the owner. It should also be capable of storing the biometric data of the individual.

“The Card shall serve as the only official identification of the person to whom it is issued and shall be valid, accepted and honored, upon presentation, in any transaction requiring the identity, status, birth and other personal circumstance,” Lacson said in his bill.