DILG sets more stringent criteria for good governance award

By on March 29, 2017


"Peace and order and development are two sides of the same coin. Hence, the DILG saw it fit to make peace and order as one of the main parameters in choosing the SGLG passers," Sueno said in a news release issued Wednesday.(Photo: Department of Interior and Local Government/ Facebook)
“Peace and order and development are two sides of the same coin. Hence, the DILG saw it fit to make peace and order as one of the main parameters in choosing the SGLG passers,” Sueno said in a news release issued Wednesday.(Photo: Department of Interior and Local Government/ Facebook)

MANILA–Local government units (LGUs) will have to work harder to earn the Department of the Interior and Local Government’s (DILG) Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG) award this year.

Interior Secretary Ismael Sueno said his department has recently scaled up the assessment criteria for SGLG, including peace and order as one of the core areas.

“Peace and order and development are two sides of the same coin. Hence, the DILG saw it fit to make peace and order as one of the main parameters in choosing the SGLG passers,” Sueno said in a news release issued Wednesday.

In SGLG 2017’s ‘4+1’ assessment criteria, LGUs must pass the four core areas and at least one essential area, either Business Friendliness and Competitiveness, Tourism, Culture and the Arts, or Environmental Protection.

A total of 81 provinces, 145 cities, and 1,489 municipalities that will be assessed for the SGLG will have a chance to be conferred a 2017 SGLG awardee’s marker; to be given access to other programs and capacity development assistance from the DILG; and can be eligible to access the Performance Challenge Fund (PCF) to finance their local development initiatives.

A special distinction will be awarded to LGUs that have consistently passed all assessment areas in three consecutive periods from 2015 to 2017.

SGLG is guided by the provisions of Republic Act 7160 or the Local Government Code of 1991, the General Appropriations Act of 2017, and Administrative Order No. 267 of 1992.