TPMT cites need to sustain public confidence in peace process

By , on February 27, 2016


Third Party Monitoring Team members (L-R) Karen Tañada, Steven Rood, Alistair MacDonald, Zainudin Malang. (Photo by the OPAPP)
Third Party Monitoring Team members (L-R) Karen Tañada, Steven Rood, Alistair MacDonald, Zainudin Malang. (Photo by the OPAPP)

MANILA – The Third-Party Monitoring Team (TPMT) on Friday cited the need to restore the public’s confidence and trust in the Bangsamoro peace process after the 16th Congress’ failure to pass the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL).

TPMT Chair Alistair MacDonald said that the non-passage of the BBL thwarted the confidence of the wider Moro community in the peace process, noting that this setback might incite radicalism among young people.

“It is possible that this setback in achieving the long-held aspirations of the Bangsamoro could increase the risk that some young people could become more attracted to violent extremism – a risk against which a successful conclusion to the peace process will be the most effective vaccination,” said MacDonald during the release of TPMT’s third annual public report in Pasig City.

MacDonald said it would be essential to build a path forward, so that the next administration could hit the ground running, and to work to sustain public confidence in the process during this period of transition.

He added that the TPMT remained confident that the prize of peace could be attained, noting that “no administration can afford to ignore the costs of conflict in Mindanao – the human costs, the developmental costs, the security costs, or the risk of worsening a climate conducive to the spread of violent extremism.”

TPMT was set up by the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the MILF to monitor the implementation of the peace agreements between both parties. It monitors, reviews, and assesses the progress of the implementation of commitments by both GPH and MILF.