Outbreak of salmonella infections linked to frozen raw breaded chicken products

By on June 29, 2015


(Shutterstock image)
(Shutterstock image)

OTTAWA – The Public Health Agency of Canada says an outbreak of salmonella infections in four provinces has been linked to frozen raw breaded chicken products.

The agency says there are 44 cases of salmonella illness – 28 in Ontario, 12 in Quebec, and two each in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador – and all became sick between Feb. 7 and May 23.

Twelve people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported.

Salmonella is commonly found in raw chicken and frozen raw breaded chicken products, but the agency says illnesses can be avoided if safe food handling, preparation and cooking practices are followed.

The agency says anyone can become sick with a salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness.

Most people who become ill from a salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days, but it is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and not get sick or show any symptoms, but still be able to spread the infection to others.

Symptoms of a salmonella infection typically start six to 72 hours after exposure and can include fever, chills, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headache, nausea and vomiting.