Balikatan maneuvers ‘win-win’ situation for PHL, U.S.

By on April 26, 2015


U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment quickly return to their Amphibious Assault Vehicle to grab extra equipment needed on the firing line, April 21, during a bilateral amphibious landing by the Philippine and U.S. Marines on North Beach at the Naval Education Training Center in Zambales, Philippines, as part of exercise Balikatan 2015. Designed to assault any shoreline from the well decks of Navy assault ships, AAVs are highly mobile, tracked armored amphibious vehicles that transport Marines and cargo to and through hostile territory. Balikatan, which means “shoulder-to-shoulder” in Filipino, is an annual bilateral training exercise held since 1984, aimed at improving the ability of Philippine and U.S. military forces to work together during planning, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations.  (Cpl. Matthew Bragg / US Marine Corps Website)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment quickly return to their Amphibious Assault Vehicle to grab extra equipment needed on the firing line, April 21, during a bilateral amphibious landing by the Philippine and U.S. Marines on North Beach at the Naval Education Training Center in Zambales, Philippines, as part of exercise Balikatan 2015. Designed to assault any shoreline from the well decks of Navy assault ships, AAVs are highly mobile, tracked armored amphibious vehicles that transport Marines and cargo to and through hostile territory. Balikatan, which means “shoulder-to-shoulder” in Filipino, is an annual bilateral training exercise held since 1984, aimed at improving the ability of Philippine and U.S. military forces to work together during planning, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations. (Cpl. Matthew Bragg / US Marine Corps Website)

CLARK AIR FORCE BASE, PAMPANGA — With Balikatan 2015 maneuvers ending in a couple of days, American exercise director Brig. Gen. Christoper J. Mahoney said the joint military maneuvers between the U.S. and the Philippines is proving “highly successful”.

He made this statement during the sidelights of the aircraft display portion of the Balikatan Saturday at Clark Air Base, Pampanga.

Mahoney also stressed that the military exercises, which started April 20 and will be terminated on the 30th, have created greater confidence between the U.S. and Philippine militaries.

“It’s a win-win situation for the two allies,” he added.

Mahoney also stressed that Balikatan 2015 is proving the biggest joint maneuvers so far as around 11,600 American and Filipino troops have engaged in land, air, and sea exercises which so far have proven very successful.

Earlier, Balikatan public information officer Lt. Col. Marlowe Patria said this year’s joint exercises will be vastly different as territorial defense will be given focused by participating military forces.

He added that this is to ensure that the country’s military forces has the capability to defend itself aside from helping in disaster response and community development.

“(This year’s Balikatan) will be quite different as it will be focus on territorial defense aside from disaster response and community development,” he added.

Patria also stressed that the decision to include territorial defense is not aimed at any nation in particular, adding that the overall goal is to ensure that the AFP will able to enhance its capability to protect the country from any threat.