Corruption heightens disaster risk — UK analyst

By , on March 6, 2015


Debris lines the streets of Tacloban, Leyte island. This region was the worst affected by the typhoon, causing widespread damage and loss of life. Caritas is responding by distributing food, shelter, hygiene kits and cooking utensils. (Photo: Eoghan Rice - Trócaire / Caritas)
Debris lines the streets of Tacloban, Leyte island. This region was the worst affected by the typhoon, causing widespread damage and loss of life. Caritas is responding by distributing food, shelter, hygiene kits and cooking utensils. (Photo: Eoghan Rice – Trócaire / Caritas)

MANILA — An environmentalist analyst said that more than natural hazards, corruption also increases disaster risk in the country.

James Allan, head of environment at global risk analytic company Verisk Maplecroft cited the Natural Hazards Atlas and said that poverty and corruption may make the country more vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters.

The disasters include cyclones, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, storm surges, volcanoes and landslides.

“Countries with higher levels of corruption and poverty typically suffer more fatalities per disaster event, so both factors are likely to heighten risk for the Philippines from the regular natural hazards that affect the country,” Allan said in an e-mail exchange with Philippine Star.

In the international study, top ten cities in the country that are more at risk were identified. These are Tuguegarao (2nd), Lucena (3rd), Manila (4th), San Fernando (5th) and Cabantuan (6th).

“If the government can do more to tackle corruption and make sure that everyone benefits from economic growth then the country should be better able to withstand future natural hazards,” he said.